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speaking, turkey, saudi arabia and cutter. >> washington and london compared to -- prepared for possible strikes against serial -- serious military targets. >> let's go now to washington and our correspondent there. what is the latest you are hearing about how the talks have been going in the u.n.? >> russia and china did not back the draft resolution, condemning their use of chemical weapons by the assad regime and asking for permission to take all necessary measures to protect civilians. the draft resolution would authorize force to protect civilians from chemical weapons. it was not a big surprise, at least not for me. after a meeting in the security council, the ambassadors in france and the united kingdom came together in a meeting behind closed doors and now they are consulting with governments in paris, london and washington. i don't expect any u.n. resolution today or tomorrow. >> the british foreign secretary says talks at the u.n. need to go on for a few more days. does that mean an imminent attack is off the table? >> i don't think this is true. i think the americans and briti
that brought down a presidency. amazon founder jeff bezos is to buy the washington post. >> a big anniversary on mars. the one-year anniversary of the curiosity rover on the surface of the red planet. >> thanks for joining us. a court in hungary has convicted for right-wing extremist for murders in 2008 and 2009. three received life sentences and a fourth man got a 14-year sentence. >> hon. officials have been accused of moving slowly to investigate the crimes -- hungarian officials have been accused of moving slowly. >> hostility toward minorities has grown in hungary in recent years. a far-right party has become the third largest in parliament. >> the men shot dead one victim was she was sleeping. they also set a house on the buyer. and those inside tried to escape, they shot dead a child and his father. >> the accused are guilty as charged. they are sentenced to life in prison without parole. >> she is the mother of the man killed while fleeing his burning home. she says authorities botched investigations. >> there are many strange things about this case. the problem is that little things
to washington. >> caught in someone else's war -- how the conflict in syria is taking its toll on the country's children. >> and bundesliga is back. bayern kick off the german soccer season. there is a chill in the air and it has people reminiscing about the cold war. >> foreign ministers from the united states and russia met in washington. their mission -- to bridge the differences that have stopped talks between their bosses. >> u.s. president barack obama canceled plans to meet russian president putin next month. >> what sounded like a slap at obama, the russian prime minister told reporters it is time for the u.s. and russia to work together as grown-ups. >> he came to washington with a long list of issues. up for discussion, afghanistan, iran, and north korea, arms control, and human rights. both sides were ready for open and frank talks, but on this day, one issue overshadowed all the rest. >> it's no secret that we have experienced some challenging moments. obviously not just over the snowden case. we will discuss these differences today for certain, but this meeting remains important
of the invasion with iraq. washington said any action it takes would be based on national security needs. >> in london, a big cameron has been laying out his case for military intervention as parliament there debates the issue. >> lively debate in london's house of commons as lawmakers debate whether britain should intervene with military measures in syria. prime minister david cameron said the use of chemical weapons in syria demanded a strong response. he said britain would exhaust all the options but warned that his government was not prepared to insist on unanimous support. >> you could have a situation in a country where it's country was literally annihilating people in the country, but because of one veto on the security council you would be hampered from taking any action. >> the opposition labor party is expected to vote against the government motion, which asks parliament to approve military action in principle. a second vote still be necessary to authorize a tax. that will not be before united nations inspectors in serial finish their work. on saturday, they are to leave the co
.s. president barack obama has made it clear washington is in no rush to intervene in serious. >> that's right. on friday, he called the apparent gassing of hundreds of serious civilians troubling and a big event of grave concern, but he offered no sign that the u.s. military will move to stop the civil war war. >> on the ground, human inspectors have yet to investigate the attack. they blame the rebels for blocking the investigation. >> we have a report, and again, the images may disturb some viewers. >> revels in aleppo say they have seen enough. they accuse the al-assad regime of killing hundreds of civilians with poison gas. >> the international community does not care about the killings. president obama said using chemical weapons is a red line. this line has been crossed a thousand times over. >> u.s. president barack obama has been facing increasing pressure to act, but his latest statements to broadcaster cnn were cautious. the united states continues to be the one country that people expect can do more than just simply protect their borders, but that does not mean that we have to get
washington and moscow. the u.s. president said he would the attending the g between -- the g 20 summit in saint readers for as planned. -- st. petersburg as planned. this retaliation from washington was expected, so obama's cancellation does not come as a big surprise, does it? >> no, it was not a surprise. it was more that the obama administration has done everything in their power to prevent russia from giving asylum to snowden. obama personally called to discuss this issue. but potent regards him -- clinton regatta missile the president and that is why -- putin regards obama as a weak president and that is why he wants to send the signal. >> just how damaging is this snowden situation for these two world powers? >> well, the snowden issue places a burden on the relationship between the u.s. and russia. they both know they depend on each other when it comes to arms control or the situation in syria. the two governments will continue to work together. stopping the meeting on friday -- the secretary of state john kerry and chuck hagel will come together with their russian counterparts
is sentenced to 35 years in prison. we will go live to washington. >> the un security council has started emergency consultations on the latest allegation of chemical weapon used in syria. it's not clear who launched the attack just outside damascus that coincides with a visit by human investigators looking into previous charges that such illegal weapons were used. >> syria authorities deny claims by opposition activists that they were behind the attack in which toxic gases are said to have killed at least 100 people. we have to warn you that this next report contains very distressing images. >> the assad regime has only officially agreed to allow investigators to inspect three sites for traces of chemical weapons, but there are now calls for them to also be given asset -- access to wear opposition groups say the regime carried out a massacre, allegedly deploying poison gas during an intense rocket and artillery barrage on wednesday. activists say hundreds of people were killed. some reports say more than 1000. this internet video allegedly shows the aftermath of the attack and victims be
.s.? obama could arm the rebels. washington has already promised military aid for syrian rebels, but fears that weapons could fall into the wrong hands have held back deliveries. obama could issue a presidential order for those weapons transfers to go through. president obama could enforce a no-fly zone over syria. . and opposition forces can do little to stop government airstrikes. and nato and forced -- enforced no-fly zone helped make the fight their success. it would be difficult and expensive. at the u.s. could order airstrikes against regime targets. the u.s. action with nato in cozumel could serve as a blueprint or efforts in syria. widespread violence forced thousands to flee the country. russian road test made it alone. ships off the coast fired cruise missiles into serbian territory. the u.s. navy could do the same in syria. for u.s. warships are already anchored off the syrian coast. but the danger of civilian casualties is high. without broad support by the international community, military action could spark a wider regional conflict. syria is surrounded by israel, lebanon, ir
talking a few minutes ago cross over to washington, and to our correspondent there. we heard an excerpt of what president obama had to say. what do you make of those comments? >> that was the most important part. he did not say that much, because he was meeting with the leaders of baltic states. the most important part was when he said that he had not made up his mind yet whether and when, and what kind of military strike the u.s. would take in syria. he assured the american public, no boots on the ground in syria. he said that twice. all administration officials are trying to convince the american public, this is not going to be a second a rack -- iraq. >> there were quite emphatic comments from john kerry, secretary of state. does this show that there is growing sentiment for military intervention in syria? >> absolutely. kerry speaks to the public, and the momentum starts building. it was a very powerful speech. he laid out the evidence that the americans have without going into detail, because much of it is classified. he tried to make the argument why it is the americans who should
during the uprising. >> this is after the day that saw washington shift its tone, calling for it to be more inclusive. saying that banning people -- ending the muslim brotherhood would be a bad idea. >> this report on a crisis that has claimed more than 800 lives. >> on saturday, a confrontation played out here. now, the army is determined to prevent new practice in the mosque. >> no one will listen to the other side. no one cares about the other side and no one is taking into account of their opinions. no one is offering a solution. people have to listen to each other and take each other seriously. >> an attack early on monday highlights the lawlessness in the region. they ambushed and killed dozens of egyptian police. meanwhile, fresh killings have triggered outrage among islamists. supporters died while being transported. officials say the prisoners suffocated on tear gas fired after they took a guard hostage. the deaths were murder. the continuing violence is here that it could collapse into civil war. the exit egyptian president could soon walk free. they are said to
's snowden stays in russia, he could become a stumbling block in u.s.-russian relations. washington wants moscow to extradite snowden to face charges of espionage and the theft of class of five nsa documents, but that is something the russian government has declined to do. >> where might snowden be? is he safe? for more, let's cross over to our moscow correspondent. do we have any idea where snowden may be and what his conditions are for him in russia? >> his whereabouts are still the big secret that is not revealed due to security reasons. for told the last image was a man very similar to him getting into a car surrounded by men who look like security officers. also with his russian lawyer next in him, and where the car was headed, we do not know. his lawyer says he has american friends in russia who would now take care of his safety. he does not elaborate any further. we can assume, though, that the russian authorities would play some role in protecting snowden because it would be quite an embarrassing moment for russia if such a famous refugee were to suddenly disappear. >> the white h
and washington question mark this had been in the works for a while. >> that is right. the german government had been pushing to suspend this intelligence sharing agreement. ever since the revelations from edward snowden emerged. the agreement is not clear. we are getting mixed signals and having the foreign minister of germany saying this is a necessary consequence of the bates about privacy protection. on the other hand we are hearing that this intelligence sharing agreement was apparently a cold war relic. but it was obsolete and some are saying the significance of the suspension is largely symbolic. >> this whole nsa affair, we have seen protests across germany. that is shaping up to be a hot clinical topic. >> definitely a hot topic for the election campaign. we're seeing that the german government is under intense pressure to explain what it knew about surveillance activities. elementary oversight committees are being held on the subject. a couple more scheduled for this month. we're a few weeks away away from elections so definitely a hot topic area and >> thank you for the analysis. >> h
, we go to max hoffman, covering washington. here we go again with this talk about a red line with chemical weapons in serious set by washington. any chance this time that the u.s. is going to move and take action? >> there is really no sign for that at the moment. the only official word we've heard from the white house actually was from the deputy press secretary, who insisted that the united nations should investigate what happened in syria on wednesday. of course, the top military officer in the country publicly, basically, giving advice against ramping up military presence in syria. by the way, interesting detail -- general dempsey was supposed to talk to foreign media on wednesday, but he canceled at the last minute. regulation is this is tied to what happened in syria. >> is there any way now at this stage to convince them to finally do something about serious -- syria? >> among diplomats in new york, they think that china probably could be swayed if russia was not so firmly standing behind the assad regime at the moment. there really is no indication for russia changing
by the nsa. >> today, the man who oversees intelligence in angela merkel's government says washington offered this deal to try to allay german peoples fears that their text and phone calls are being spied spied on by foreign agency. he appeared for the second time in front of a lawmakers committee. >> it has been dominating the headlines just six weeks before national elections in germany. now the government is hoping this new pledge will neutralize the issue. >> the government's chief of staff was grilled for six hours on the nation -- on the nature of german collaborators with foreign intelligence agencies. he has been assured that neither the u.s. or britain rope protection laws. >> according to the nsa and british intelligence agencies, german laws have been observed. the rights of our citizens in germany are being safeguarded. >> he says the nsa and british intelligence agencies ensured him in writing that their activities had not been a regular trade in the wake of the spying program revealed by edward snowden, many remain skeptical, none more so than germany's opposition. >> there is n
sank about one kilometer from sure. >> a report in the "washington post" newspaper says america's nsa intelligence agency has broken privacy laws and overstepped its legal authority thousands of times, citing documents leaked by edward snowden. the paper says most of the infringements involved unauthorized surveillance of americans and foreigners in the united states. >> a controversial french lawyer often nicknamed devils advocate has died at the age of 88. he defended some of the 20th century's most notorious criminals, including a former captain of the nazi secret police and ex-yugoslav leader. well, ecuador has just scrapped a huge conservation plan. it was an ambitious one that had been designed to stop oil drilling in parts of the national park in the amazon rain forest. >> nor's president decided to raise funds for one of the most bio diverse areas in the world. >> however, he says only a tiny fraction of the money trickled in. he has ditched the plan and is opening up the basin to oil drilling instead. >> ecuador's national park is a largely untouched national wonder. the rain
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15

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